Sunday Mortuary Round-Up

Here is a quick run down of some of the interesting mortuary archaeology finds of the week and links to full articles.

Human Skeletons and Vessels Dating from 900 to 1521 AD Located at Tamtoc, San Luis Potosi: Five prehispanic burials were found at Tamtoc, San Luis Potosi this last week. The burials were located within a single structure and were found with a large number of grave goods, as well as personal ornamentation and clothing. They have been interpreted as being elites due to the presence of prestigious goods. It will be interesting to see what further study reveals about their placement within the site, and the bioarchaeology of the individuals themselves. From Art Daily http://www.artdaily.com/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=44132

Pyramid that Contains Maya Tomb at Palenque Archaeological Zone Restored: A funerary chamber of a possible elite has been found at the Palenque site beneath a temple. The site dates to the early classic period, approximately 430 to 600 A.D. and is unique in being so early- most of these types of temples date to the late classic. Video from the excavation revealed that the chamber contained a number of murals, grave goods, as well as human remains. From Art Daily http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=44123

The battle of Derry has been a famous turning point in Irish history. The battle took place in 1689, as part of the English Glorious Revolution where Protestants and Catholics fought for control. Three skeletal remains have been found at a church near the battle, and are presumed to the the first of a large mass grave of the soldiers. Further analysis may be able to reveal who was fighting, the injuries sustained, and create a richer understanding of what occurred. From Arch News http://www.archnews.co.uk/featured/4708-17th-century-mass-grave-of-siege-found-in-derry-n-ireland.html

17 tombs were unearthed in Qilong Village, in China’s Sichuan Province. It includes two timber tombs dating to the Western Han dynasty, nine brick tombs dating to the Eastern Han dynasty, and six brick tombs dating back to the Song dynasty. There is little information about the site, but the combination of different styles of tombs is potentially revealing about China’s past and the competition between dynasties. From People’s Daily http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90782/7251183.html

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